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Video: Slice - "Appearances Are Deceiving" (@KaosSteve)


Video: Slice - "Appearances Are Deceiving"

Courtesy S.L.

I want to send you my new song/video "Appearances Are Deceiving."

Video: Sean Price Borrows a CitiBike (@SeanMandela @DuckDownMusic)


Video: Sean Price Borrows a CitiBike

Courtesy Matt B.

Sean Price exposes a flaw in the system of the new CitiBike’s around New York City.

Video by Justin Fleischer for Can.Did Media
Additional Footage by Shane Gill for Duck Down Visuals

Video: @GlowsintheDark @CountBassD - "Up and Down"


Video: Glows in the Dark f/ Count Bass D - "Up and Down"

Courtesy John R.

Glows in the Dark is an Avant Garde Jazz Collective based out of Richmond, VA. "Up and Down" is off Glow's Latest EP - Research and Development, the song features The incomparable Count Bass D taking you on a journey with his voice over a spiritual sound bed of acoustic instrumentation. Check out the visual that was shot during Scott Burton of GITD's trip to Bali, Indonesia.

Audio: Charlie @Brigante414 f/ Baby Drew, L.E.$ "Playa Card"


Audio: Charlie Brigante f/ Baby Drew, L.E.$ - "Playa Card"

Courtesy No Cure PR.

“Playa Card” is the official single for Charlie Brigante’s “Zig Zag 5” mixtape, that will be hosted by DJ Bumz & features Baby Drew & L.E.$ of Boss Hogg Outlaws. Milwaukee based Charlie Brigante has worked with top artists such as 2Pac’s Outlawz, Bizzy Bone, Twista, Jagged Edge, Rappin 4Tay, Coo Coo Cal and many more.

Audio: @TwoineyLo - "The Usual Suspect" #Trayvon


Audio: Twoiney Lo - "The Usual Suspect"

Courtesy Taylor E.

Today we're sending you a new track by TwoineyLo called "The Usual Suspect". We believe that you would love to write about the song because it is pointed at the Zimmerman Trial that has been very popular across the nation.

Video: M.A.K. "The M3 Song" (@Mack_Block_Ent @Mak847 @Lilfun)


Video: M.A.K. - "The M3 Song"

Courtesy NC PR.

This is the first single from the new hot label in Sacramento Mack Block Ent. This song was released early due to a tragic event; the passing of hood legend M3. This will be the second album to drop from M.A.K this year, and third so far.

Audio: Mpulse - "Bitches & Bops" (prod. Don Cannon)


Audio: Mpulse - "Bitches & Bops" (prod. Don Cannon)

Courtesy Austin M.

"Sofa Gun: The Sequel" serves as a free album and is fully produced by Keef Boyd and hosted by Don Cannon. After over 2 years of working closely with Keef Boyd and Don Cannon, it is finally seeing a release tomorrow (July 16th).

Video: @thejacka @therealdubbleoo f/ J.Stalin "Time Standing Still"


Video: The Jacka & Dubble-OO f/ J.Stalin "Time Standing Still"

Courtesy Matt B.

Futuristic Mob is collaboration album between Bay Area standout The Jacka & Dubble-OO who team up to give the West Coast a breath of fresh air with there Mob influenced audio landscape. The LP is a guaranteed crowd pleaser with standout tracks "Time Standin Still" f/ J.Stalin, "VIP" f/ E-40 (produced by Droop-E) & many more.

@Murs "Falling in Flames" Music Video (@DuckDownMusic)


Murs "Falling in Flames" Music Video

Courtesy Matt B.

Animation music video from Murs off his new album ‘Yumiko: Curse of the Merch Girl,’ out now.



Purchase the Album + 70-Page Digital Comic Book Bundle at iTunes now: http://smarturl.it/yumiko.
The (W)rap Up - Week of July 9, 2013 (@MannyWallace)


If you missed any of the new reviews this past week including Jay-Z's "Magna Carta...Holy Grail" then do yourself a favor and check out this week's edition of the (W)rap Up!

Courtesy @MannyWallace

[Magna Carta... Holy Grail] Jay-Z :: Magna Carta... Holy Grail
Samsung/Roc Nation

Author: Grant Jones

"Give me a CD any day. Smart phones and digital downloads are brilliant and incredibly convenient, but it took me hours to get this Jay-Z app working on my Samsung Galaxy phone. For those of you sleeping under a Roc, Jay has partnered with Samsung to offer his latest album FREE to the first million consumers that manage to download a certain app. Other than the technological problems (perhaps a victim of his own success) and the fact you're asked to link up your Facebook so Shawn and Beyonce can laugh in to their platinum-plated Galaxy S4s at our mundane status updates, it's an admirable idea. Twelve studio albums in seventeen years is incredible for any emcee, never mind one that has numerous business ventures on the go and the world's sexiest pop star to satisfy. Jay-Z is undeniably the biggest "star" that hip hop has produced and despite the inevitable naysayers any successful musician has to deal with, he still has a lyrical quality that other rap superstars dream of. Illuminati allegations, biting Biggie, mishandling Def Jam, none of it matters when you're selling stakes in NBA teams and introducing the world to artists like Rihanna. Hell, I'm one of those "heads" who still insists "Reasonable Doubt" is his best record, and through seventeen years he has barely put a foot wrong (other than co-signing Memphis Bleek, and wasting MOP's time). At 43 years of age, Jay-Z is also somehow still fashionable, continues to be hugely popular and goes against everything hip hop traditionally does with anybody over 40 – kicks them to the curb. To include the words ‘Magna Carta' in his latest album not only implies that Jigga is making a statement of intent, but it keeps in line nicely with his monarchical status; "Blueprint", "Dynasty", "Kingdom Come", "Watch the Throne". Notice a pattern? "Magna Carta... Holy Grail" (let's call it MCHG, as the Samsung app does) is anything but the esoteric bullshit it may sound like. Jigga ain't no Killah Priest, so don't expect mystical references and history lessons here. The title of the album is in fact, pointless. Most of the record sees Mr Carter share his insanely exuberant lifestyle, adding the odd dash of real life here and there. "Picasso Baby" is produced by Timbaland and Adrian Younge, and it's unclear whether they co-produced or each provided a beat. Much like "A Milion And One Questions" suddenly flips into "Rhyme No More" on Jigga's sophomore release "In My Lifetime Vol. 1?, "Picasso Baby" is full of wordplay and the "is he freestyling?" presence, but is so bogged down in talk about excess and "wanting a wife to fuck like a prostitute" that it doesn't come in to fruition until the second beat hits."

The Extremities :: Re:Fresh :: Droppin' Science Productions 
as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon

[Re:Fresh]"Occasionally I'm struck by the fact my interest (obsession) with Canadian hip-hop probably drives a segment of the readership insane. I can't help it though - I got in on the ground floor early with Maestro Fresh-Wes thanks to a tape trading friend in high school. The love never faded as I rolled from era to era - but what did change was that my interests became increasingly underground. It's easy enough to big up Swollen Members and Classified because they get some degree of U.S. crossover exposure, but D-Sisive and the Sweatshop Union are just as interesting with or without the buzz. Underground and indie rap heads know that, but on both sides of the border heads bump Drake and Tyga while ignoring the opportunities for deeper exploration right in front of them. Putting aside my fondness for maple syrup, backbacon and donuts from Timmys for a minute though, lets talk about The Extremities - and no not the ones you can't reach after your gut expands from all those calories. They are more or less the resident in-house producers for Droppin' Science Productions, which besides having a name both Nas and Extra P can appreciate has a roster of talent that goes above and beyond even for this wannabe Canuck. GhettosocksMuneshine and Timbuktu just to name a few all call DSP their home. So needless to say I was as excited about "Re:Fresh" as I was to learn that Jay Onrait and Dan O'Toole would anchor Fox Sports 1 when it debuts. (My Canadian friends are not so happy they are leaving though.) A compilation album of their best remixes combined with Canada's best rappers = GOLD. "Re:Fresh" did not disappoint in any way. "Cold Cheese" is a fun rap track from the jump with the "five star generals" of ELMNT, Brandon Dramatic and Roshin. "

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_ReFresh.html

JohnNY U x Lafayette Stokely :: We Three Kings EP :: TMB Music 
as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon

[We Three Kings]"Christmas in July? That was my first thought when hearing the opening hymn of the "We Three Kings" EP. There's no yuletide joy to be found here - it's just a means by which to introduce rappers JohnNY U and Lafayette Stokely plus their producer Motel Eola. I know a little about the latter thanks to the fact I get frequent press releases about his latest projects, and having listened to a few casually I felt the UK producer was up to snuff. It's good to see him joining the ranks of those who want to do cross-ocean collaboration, bringing the former colonies and their spurned monarchy back together in hip-hop unity. There's a small amount of frustration for me here in the fact that this EP, albeit a free download, is not segmented into the individual songs. It's one 13 minute long track, which I suppose makes it easier to know how long the EP is, but not at the expense of me having to chop it up with Audacity myself just so I can choose the song I want. Of course if I do chop it up I might take out the entire Joe Louis and Rocky Marciano skit, which is unrepentantly pilfered from "Coming to America." It's not that it isn't funny, or that the reference to a movie about kings in Queens doesn't fit the album name, but it's nothing but filler from a movie I've seen a hundred times already. If I want to see Eddie Murphy I'll watch it - I won't play this album to hear it."

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_wethreekings.html

King Sun :: Strictly Ghetto :: Cold Chillin' Records 
** RapReviews "Back to the Lab" series **
as reviewed by Matt Jost

[Strictly Ghetto]"In his heyday King Sun was almost a model rapper. With his commanding baritone, precise metrics and topical writing he was a rapper you had to, at least to some degree, take seriously. He may have been responsible for rap music's first lyric begging for a '(no homo)' when he described himself as "fruitier than a grape" on an early track, but his song material contained enough evidence that there was no fucking with King Sun, generally speaking. He personally went after bootleggers and already in the '80s felt the need to defend his interests with a gun when dealing with record company people. Rap folklore also has it he came to the aid of Ice Cube and his Lench Mob in an altercation with Above the Law at the 1990 New Music Seminar. On the artistic side, both his albums made statements in song form that hold up to this day, and especially his sophomore effort "Righteous But Ruthless" showcased an extraordinarily focused MC. But while he didn't have to wrestle with the creative aspects of his career, his dealings with the industry were a different story. His relationship with Profile Records was strained even before "XL" was finally put out. He eventually bought himself out of his contract and went independent, setting up Money Bag Records and releasing exactly one single in 1992 with previous collaborators The Hollywood Impact and Tony D. In an 1994 interview he voiced his discontent with being placed on the less illustrious posse track on Fat Joe's debut and additionally claimed authorship for two songs on the album he wasn't credited for. He submitted a track for the "Who's the Man" soundtrack that didn't make the cut and he witnessed Ice Cube use an idea he had shown him in good confidence for the "Predator" single "Wicked.""

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/BTTL_strictlyghetto.html

Mad Dukez & Fresh Kils :: Gettin' Gatsby :: DTR45 
as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon

[Gettin' Gatsby]"In the span of a year I've gone from meeting Mad Dukez for the first time to anticipating each and every project he drops. Presumably for the RR audience it's been the same. Dukez provides a refreshing break from the mediocrity of the mass media, where every rapper brags about how rich they get and how much P they hit. Perhaps Dukez benefits from being from Buffalo though, without the typical New York pressure to keep up with the Joneses and the Carters. He certainly benefits from his friendship with Fresh Kils, who matches him bar for bar with beat for beat. 2013's "Gettin' Gatsby" comes with an intentional wink and a smile to the rap audience. The album's title clearly capitalizes on the latest film to revisit F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, but dig a little deeper and the novel itself could be a study in mainstream rap. The parallels aren't hard to find - from the conspicuous consumption, to the envy of the haves toward the have-nots, right down to the accepted level of violence and the casualties of gunplay. There's clearly an analogy here, right down to Uncle Fester's scratches at the end of "People Players." KRS-One runs down the roles, Phife Dawg professes a lack of shame at it all, while CL Smooth vows he's "blowin up spots for knots in the millennium." "Bootleg Bartenders" even reflects the prohibition of the roaring 20's. I'll probably be quoting lines from the song at random from here on, like "your heart-burns with the envy you should take Tums." Dukez is clever without being a showboat, without having to cram multiple punchlines into a bar, without having to run way the fuck off beat just to fit in all the big words he knows. "

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_gettingatsby.html

Readywriter :: Paradyme Shift :: GodChaserz Entertainment 
as reviewed by Jaroslav 'Czechone' Lavick

[Paradyme Shift]"I'm not of the faith myself, but there was a point in time (around the late 90's/early 2000's) when I took an interest in Christian hip hop, at least to the extent that I acquired a couple dozen or so albums. I wasn't drawn to the sub-genre for religious reasons, but a lot of secular hip hop of that era was feeling stale to me so I saw Christian hip hop as something fresh and different. Artists such as Corey Red and Precise, Dirt, Hazakim, Descendantz, Secta7, Walking Dead and The Cross Movement delivered a raw and creative underground East Coast sound that outshone a lot of the music that was coming from the secular hip hop world at the time. Albums such as "Hip Hologetics" by Hazakim, "Divine Rootz" by Descendantz, "The Invasion" by Secta7 and "House of Representatives" by The Cross Movement were simply excellent. Particularly appealing was that a lot of the artists were following that Wu fam/Jedi Mind Tricks production style that was popular then, with added levels of aura and mystique which I was a real sucker for. Yeah sure they rapped about the LORD but not in the preachy, door-knocking "repent your sins and be saved" sense; it was generally more succinctly done, or executed in far more complex ways discussing the historical ideologies, metaphysics and such. Secta7 in particular were a group of MC's that went to lyrical depths that would make Killah Priest proud, and they were a type of Wu-Tang Clan in the sense that they had a core group with many members, extended "fam" members and offshoot groups. For a neutral listener, a lot of the artists were no more confronting or offending than your favourite MC who repped the Five Percent Nation; you could absorb the lyrics, digest them and possibly learn something, or simply detach yourself from the verbals and enjoy the dope production and skilled emcees. I always found it quite curious that most of us could happily listen to rappers kicking it about Allah, Ganksta N-I-P chopping up bodies, Cube calling white women cave bitches, every 2nd rapper telling us how he is the ladies' gift etc. etc. - but someone rapping about Jesus was too much to bear? "

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_paradymeshift.html

Remz :: Consequence & Chaos EP :: BandCamp.com 
as reviewed by Patrick Taylor

[Consequence & Chaos EP]"The documentary "Waiting for Sugarman" was about how much the obscure American artist Rodriguez influenced South African music. Rodriguez's albums were bootlegged all over South Africa in the 80s, and he ended up being bigger than Elvis there despite being completely obscure in his home country. After listening to a fair amount of Australian rap, I can't help but wonder if the same thing didn't happen in Australia with Onyx's "Bacdafucup." So much of the rap I hear from the land down under seems to be directly influenced by Onyx's rowdy classic, including Adelaide rapper Remz's latest EP "Consequence and Chaos." The opener "I'm a Monster" is pure Onyx: yelled raps over hard, stripped down beats. Remz raps like a man who's gone over the edge, comparing himself to the Mexican mafia. When Kanye claimed to be a monster, he meant he was a monster star and monster personality. Remz means it in the more literal sense, as the video for the song illustrates. You don't need to read his bio to know that he came up in the battle scene. Every verse seems custom-designed to make opponents quiver in their Timbs. What's interesting about Remz is that he's not just bragging about being a badass. He raps just as much about how screwed up he is. He comes off in his rhymes as guy who is drowning himself in drugs and booze to cover up some serious issues. "Consequences & Chaos" describes the cycle of self-destructive behavior he's stuck in, starting the day by drinking rotgut from a flask and going downhill from there.  "I just need a release from this evil and pain" he raps on "Let It Rain." Remz proves that there is more to him than being rowdy and loud. Remz's super aggressive flow doesn't always work as well when he tries to tone it down. He's like a car that can only go 100 miles an hour: he's great when he can go full throttle, but he struggles when the volume and tempo go down. He stumbles on the title track trying to adapt his aggro flow to the slower, quieter beat. I also found his accent hard to understand at times, but that's more on me than him; I'm sure Aussie listeners will have no problem understanding Remz."

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_consequencechaos.html[Magna Carta... Holy Grail] Jay-Z :: Magna Carta... Holy Grail
Samsung/Roc Nation

Author: Grant Jones

"Give me a CD any day. Smart phones and digital downloads are brilliant and incredibly convenient, but it took me hours to get this Jay-Z app working on my Samsung Galaxy phone. For those of you sleeping under a Roc, Jay has partnered with Samsung to offer his latest album FREE to the first million consumers that manage to download a certain app. Other than the technological problems (perhaps a victim of his own success) and the fact you're asked to link up your Facebook so Shawn and Beyonce can laugh in to their platinum-plated Galaxy S4s at our mundane status updates, it's an admirable idea. Twelve studio albums in seventeen years is incredible for any emcee, never mind one that has numerous business ventures on the go and the world's sexiest pop star to satisfy. Jay-Z is undeniably the biggest "star" that hip hop has produced and despite the inevitable naysayers any successful musician has to deal with, he still has a lyrical quality that other rap superstars dream of. Illuminati allegations, biting Biggie, mishandling Def Jam, none of it matters when you're selling stakes in NBA teams and introducing the world to artists like Rihanna. Hell, I'm one of those "heads" who still insists "Reasonable Doubt" is his best record, and through seventeen years he has barely put a foot wrong (other than co-signing Memphis Bleek, and wasting MOP's time). At 43 years of age, Jay-Z is also somehow still fashionable, continues to be hugely popular and goes against everything hip hop traditionally does with anybody over 40 – kicks them to the curb. To include the words ‘Magna Carta' in his latest album not only implies that Jigga is making a statement of intent, but it keeps in line nicely with his monarchical status; "Blueprint", "Dynasty", "Kingdom Come", "Watch the Throne". Notice a pattern? "Magna Carta... Holy Grail" (let's call it MCHG, as the Samsung app does) is anything but the esoteric bullshit it may sound like. Jigga ain't no Killah Priest, so don't expect mystical references and history lessons here. The title of the album is in fact, pointless. Most of the record sees Mr Carter share his insanely exuberant lifestyle, adding the odd dash of real life here and there. "Picasso Baby" is produced by Timbaland and Adrian Younge, and it's unclear whether they co-produced or each provided a beat. Much like "A Milion And One Questions" suddenly flips into "Rhyme No More" on Jigga's sophomore release "In My Lifetime Vol. 1?, "Picasso Baby" is full of wordplay and the "is he freestyling?" presence, but is so bogged down in talk about excess and "wanting a wife to fuck like a prostitute" that it doesn't come in to fruition until the second beat hits."

The Extremities :: Re:Fresh :: Droppin' Science Productions 
as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon

[Re:Fresh]"Occasionally I'm struck by the fact my interest (obsession) with Canadian hip-hop probably drives a segment of the readership insane. I can't help it though - I got in on the ground floor early with Maestro Fresh-Wes thanks to a tape trading friend in high school. The love never faded as I rolled from era to era - but what did change was that my interests became increasingly underground. It's easy enough to big up Swollen Members and Classified because they get some degree of U.S. crossover exposure, but D-Sisive and the Sweatshop Union are just as interesting with or without the buzz. Underground and indie rap heads know that, but on both sides of the border heads bump Drake and Tyga while ignoring the opportunities for deeper exploration right in front of them. Putting aside my fondness for maple syrup, backbacon and donuts from Timmys for a minute though, lets talk about The Extremities - and no not the ones you can't reach after your gut expands from all those calories. They are more or less the resident in-house producers for Droppin' Science Productions, which besides having a name both Nas and Extra P can appreciate has a roster of talent that goes above and beyond even for this wannabe Canuck. GhettosocksMuneshine and Timbuktu just to name a few all call DSP their home. So needless to say I was as excited about "Re:Fresh" as I was to learn that Jay Onrait and Dan O'Toole would anchor Fox Sports 1 when it debuts. (My Canadian friends are not so happy they are leaving though.) A compilation album of their best remixes combined with Canada's best rappers = GOLD. "Re:Fresh" did not disappoint in any way. "Cold Cheese" is a fun rap track from the jump with the "five star generals" of ELMNT, Brandon Dramatic and Roshin. "

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_ReFresh.html

JohnNY U x Lafayette Stokely :: We Three Kings EP :: TMB Music 
as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon

[We Three Kings]"Christmas in July? That was my first thought when hearing the opening hymn of the "We Three Kings" EP. There's no yuletide joy to be found here - it's just a means by which to introduce rappers JohnNY U and Lafayette Stokely plus their producer Motel Eola. I know a little about the latter thanks to the fact I get frequent press releases about his latest projects, and having listened to a few casually I felt the UK producer was up to snuff. It's good to see him joining the ranks of those who want to do cross-ocean collaboration, bringing the former colonies and their spurned monarchy back together in hip-hop unity. There's a small amount of frustration for me here in the fact that this EP, albeit a free download, is not segmented into the individual songs. It's one 13 minute long track, which I suppose makes it easier to know how long the EP is, but not at the expense of me having to chop it up with Audacity myself just so I can choose the song I want. Of course if I do chop it up I might take out the entire Joe Louis and Rocky Marciano skit, which is unrepentantly pilfered from "Coming to America." It's not that it isn't funny, or that the reference to a movie about kings in Queens doesn't fit the album name, but it's nothing but filler from a movie I've seen a hundred times already. If I want to see Eddie Murphy I'll watch it - I won't play this album to hear it."

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_wethreekings.html

King Sun :: Strictly Ghetto :: Cold Chillin' Records 
** RapReviews "Back to the Lab" series **
as reviewed by Matt Jost

[Strictly Ghetto]"In his heyday King Sun was almost a model rapper. With his commanding baritone, precise metrics and topical writing he was a rapper you had to, at least to some degree, take seriously. He may have been responsible for rap music's first lyric begging for a '(no homo)' when he described himself as "fruitier than a grape" on an early track, but his song material contained enough evidence that there was no fucking with King Sun, generally speaking. He personally went after bootleggers and already in the '80s felt the need to defend his interests with a gun when dealing with record company people. Rap folklore also has it he came to the aid of Ice Cube and his Lench Mob in an altercation with Above the Law at the 1990 New Music Seminar. On the artistic side, both his albums made statements in song form that hold up to this day, and especially his sophomore effort "Righteous But Ruthless" showcased an extraordinarily focused MC. But while he didn't have to wrestle with the creative aspects of his career, his dealings with the industry were a different story. His relationship with Profile Records was strained even before "XL" was finally put out. He eventually bought himself out of his contract and went independent, setting up Money Bag Records and releasing exactly one single in 1992 with previous collaborators The Hollywood Impact and Tony D. In an 1994 interview he voiced his discontent with being placed on the less illustrious posse track on Fat Joe's debut and additionally claimed authorship for two songs on the album he wasn't credited for. He submitted a track for the "Who's the Man" soundtrack that didn't make the cut and he witnessed Ice Cube use an idea he had shown him in good confidence for the "Predator" single "Wicked.""

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/BTTL_strictlyghetto.html

Mad Dukez & Fresh Kils :: Gettin' Gatsby :: DTR45 
as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon

[Gettin' Gatsby]"In the span of a year I've gone from meeting Mad Dukez for the first time to anticipating each and every project he drops. Presumably for the RR audience it's been the same. Dukez provides a refreshing break from the mediocrity of the mass media, where every rapper brags about how rich they get and how much P they hit. Perhaps Dukez benefits from being from Buffalo though, without the typical New York pressure to keep up with the Joneses and the Carters. He certainly benefits from his friendship with Fresh Kils, who matches him bar for bar with beat for beat. 2013's "Gettin' Gatsby" comes with an intentional wink and a smile to the rap audience. The album's title clearly capitalizes on the latest film to revisit F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, but dig a little deeper and the novel itself could be a study in mainstream rap. The parallels aren't hard to find - from the conspicuous consumption, to the envy of the haves toward the have-nots, right down to the accepted level of violence and the casualties of gunplay. There's clearly an analogy here, right down to Uncle Fester's scratches at the end of "People Players." KRS-One runs down the roles, Phife Dawg professes a lack of shame at it all, while CL Smooth vows he's "blowin up spots for knots in the millennium." "Bootleg Bartenders" even reflects the prohibition of the roaring 20's. I'll probably be quoting lines from the song at random from here on, like "your heart-burns with the envy you should take Tums." Dukez is clever without being a showboat, without having to cram multiple punchlines into a bar, without having to run way the fuck off beat just to fit in all the big words he knows. "

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_gettingatsby.html

Readywriter :: Paradyme Shift :: GodChaserz Entertainment 
as reviewed by Jaroslav 'Czechone' Lavick

[Paradyme Shift]"I'm not of the faith myself, but there was a point in time (around the late 90's/early 2000's) when I took an interest in Christian hip hop, at least to the extent that I acquired a couple dozen or so albums. I wasn't drawn to the sub-genre for religious reasons, but a lot of secular hip hop of that era was feeling stale to me so I saw Christian hip hop as something fresh and different. Artists such as Corey Red and Precise, Dirt, Hazakim, Descendantz, Secta7, Walking Dead and The Cross Movement delivered a raw and creative underground East Coast sound that outshone a lot of the music that was coming from the secular hip hop world at the time. Albums such as "Hip Hologetics" by Hazakim, "Divine Rootz" by Descendantz, "The Invasion" by Secta7 and "House of Representatives" by The Cross Movement were simply excellent. Particularly appealing was that a lot of the artists were following that Wu fam/Jedi Mind Tricks production style that was popular then, with added levels of aura and mystique which I was a real sucker for. Yeah sure they rapped about the LORD but not in the preachy, door-knocking "repent your sins and be saved" sense; it was generally more succinctly done, or executed in far more complex ways discussing the historical ideologies, metaphysics and such. Secta7 in particular were a group of MC's that went to lyrical depths that would make Killah Priest proud, and they were a type of Wu-Tang Clan in the sense that they had a core group with many members, extended "fam" members and offshoot groups. For a neutral listener, a lot of the artists were no more confronting or offending than your favourite MC who repped the Five Percent Nation; you could absorb the lyrics, digest them and possibly learn something, or simply detach yourself from the verbals and enjoy the dope production and skilled emcees. I always found it quite curious that most of us could happily listen to rappers kicking it about Allah, Ganksta N-I-P chopping up bodies, Cube calling white women cave bitches, every 2nd rapper telling us how he is the ladies' gift etc. etc. - but someone rapping about Jesus was too much to bear? "

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_paradymeshift.html

Remz :: Consequence & Chaos EP :: BandCamp.com 
as reviewed by Patrick Taylor

[Consequence & Chaos EP]"The documentary "Waiting for Sugarman" was about how much the obscure American artist Rodriguez influenced South African music. Rodriguez's albums were bootlegged all over South Africa in the 80s, and he ended up being bigger than Elvis there despite being completely obscure in his home country. After listening to a fair amount of Australian rap, I can't help but wonder if the same thing didn't happen in Australia with Onyx's "Bacdafucup." So much of the rap I hear from the land down under seems to be directly influenced by Onyx's rowdy classic, including Adelaide rapper Remz's latest EP "Consequence and Chaos." The opener "I'm a Monster" is pure Onyx: yelled raps over hard, stripped down beats. Remz raps like a man who's gone over the edge, comparing himself to the Mexican mafia. When Kanye claimed to be a monster, he meant he was a monster star and monster personality. Remz means it in the more literal sense, as the video for the song illustrates. You don't need to read his bio to know that he came up in the battle scene. Every verse seems custom-designed to make opponents quiver in their Timbs. What's interesting about Remz is that he's not just bragging about being a badass. He raps just as much about how screwed up he is. He comes off in his rhymes as guy who is drowning himself in drugs and booze to cover up some serious issues. "Consequences & Chaos" describes the cycle of self-destructive behavior he's stuck in, starting the day by drinking rotgut from a flask and going downhill from there.  "I just need a release from this evil and pain" he raps on "Let It Rain." Remz proves that there is more to him than being rowdy and loud. Remz's super aggressive flow doesn't always work as well when he tries to tone it down. He's like a car that can only go 100 miles an hour: he's great when he can go full throttle, but he struggles when the volume and tempo go down. He stumbles on the title track trying to adapt his aggro flow to the slower, quieter beat. I also found his accent hard to understand at times, but that's more on me than him; I'm sure Aussie listeners will have no problem understanding Remz."

http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/2013_07_consequencechaos.html

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